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Epidemics of Injustice: Environmental Health Justice - Shared screen with speaker view
Ameesha Mehta-Sampath
20:55
HI! Everyone, I am Ameesha Mehta-Sampath/ US EPA Region 2
Nicole Bertucci
21:03
Nicole Bertucci - BYNC
Joseph Rittmann
21:07
Joe Rittmann, St Paul, MN '1982
DELCY SANDERS
21:12
Hello, Delcy Sanders from Metropolitan Family Services
Shannon Kim
21:20
Hi everyone, my name is Shannon (she/her). I am a current MPH student at UIC and also enrolled in the course
Maribel Alvarez
21:20
Maribel Alvarez-BYNC
Amy Bailey
21:38
Amy Bailey, a sociologist from UIC.
Kate Nilles
21:44
Hi all, Kate Nilles (she/her) current UIC MPH student
Brandon Felton
21:47
Brandon Felton - UIC MPH/MBA Candidate - HPA Division
Jannah Bierens
21:53
Peace folx- I'm Jannah Bierens (she/her), Racial & Health Equity Consultant, Lansing MI
Alyson Giordano
21:57
Hi I’m Alyson, I’m currently an AmeriCorps volunteer but I’ll be starting my MPH in the fall!
Sarah Ferguson
22:10
Hi all, Sarah Ferguson, she/her, a social work student at UIC
Jeni Hebert Beirne
22:38
Hi everyone Jeni Hebert-Beirne Assoc Dean for Community Engagement and Collaboratory for Health Justice and UIC SPH alumni’95 and ‘08
Adrian Seeley
22:46
Adrian-Aurora, IL Prospective UIC student
Chanel Conigan
22:50
Hi, I'm Chanel. I'm a MPH student
Sari Buffill
23:15
Hi, I'm Sari. Staff @ UIC. I will be an MPH student in the fall.
Muhammad Saa'd Tinubu
24:53
Greetings all, my name is Muhammad saa'Tinubu. ám from Nigeria, Visited UIC last year with my Uncle who's a professor emeritus in public health.
DELCY SANDERS
25:37
Is the records available to everyone on the website or UIC enrolled students/alumni?
DELCY SANDERS
25:52
***recording***
Kelsey N Arnold
26:07
The recordings are available to everyone at https://publichealth.uic.edu/epidemics-of-injustice/
DOROTHY WRIGHT-FOULKES
34:45
Hello All. UIC SPH EOHS MPH
olga bautista
35:45
Thank you Washieka
Washieka Torres
38:05
What is environmental racism? How does environmental racism impact health?
Washieka Torres
38:13
this is the question currently being answered
Patricia Flores
42:02
Hi everyone! Patricia Flores (she/her) MBA/MPH, Founder of Guías. Happy to connect https://www.linkedin.com/in/patricia-flores-mph-mba/
Washieka Torres
45:02
Could you tell us about what your organization does and what environmental justice issue they address and for what population?
Randy Colon
48:02
How do you engage people with lived experience?
Alexis Grant
48:54
Great question, Randy! It goes along with our next one- we will touch on it!
Zoey Martin-Lockhart
51:00
I'm curious how your work varies (or if it varies) between natural/protected, rural, and urban areas? Especially with respect to the issues at hand, the different involved and interested parties, what form environmental justice takes in these different contexts, etc.
Meleah Geertsma
59:48
Here's a website where you can learn about the community I just described:
Meleah Geertsma
59:52
https://floodedandforgotten.com/
Randy Colon
01:00:22
If there's time, I'd like to hear if the speakers can speak about environmental ableism and how this intersects with environmental racism and/or the work they do
Yukyan Lam
01:01:45
@Zoey - There are certainly different issues and the work varies based on geography. Most of my place-based work is focused on urban areas (though NRDC does work in rural areas, for example, on pesticides, farmworker issues, 'factory farms'). In our national-level advocacy, one of the challenges we are thinking about is how to make sure the types of policies, regulations, etc. that we are proposing account for rural issues. You can see how EJ mapping tools, such as US EPA's EJSCREEN, better capture urban-based exposures than rural ones. A sound cumulative impacts tool or policy needs to be able to address both.
Alexis Grant
01:02:29
Alliance for the Great Lakes Databook: https://greatlakes.org/databook/
Zoey Martin-Lockhart
01:04:28
@Yukyan, thank you!
Washieka Torres
01:06:53
What strategies do you use for your work? (in our class we have talked about community organizing, policy making, policy advocacy, mutual aid, etc.)
Alexis Grant
01:07:19
What strategies do you use for your work? (in our class we have talked about community organizing, policy making, advocacy, mutual aid, etc.)? How do you engage people with lived experience?
Ruth Velazquez
01:08:14
Does your organization tackle any issues related to climate change and involving folks in that?
Yukyan Lam
01:08:56
Yes, adding to that list community-based science, too. And harnessing the power of community-based science tools to better capture lived experience, to help mobilize folks, to help get youth engaged.
Meleah Geertsma
01:10:30
We have many many more people who work on climate change!
Zoey Martin-Lockhart
01:10:33
From what I know of environmental work, especially at the grassroots level (some of my family works in that field), even within an organization sometimes grassroots strategies are devalued, too.
Zoey Martin-Lockhart
01:10:41
(just to what Meleah was saying)
Meleah Geertsma
01:10:47
I'd say a smaller percent internally of those people directly engage people in climate work.
Meleah Geertsma
01:11:03
Again there's a growing recognition that such engagement and collaboration is critical.
Meleah Geertsma
01:11:42
Very true, Zoey!
Yukyan Lam
01:11:54
@Ruth - at NRDC, the short answer is yes, as Meleah said, there are many teams at NRDC focused explicitly on what you might consider 'climate mitigation.' But the longer answer is that issues of climate and environmental justice are very much related. One example of that is the Equitable and Just National Climate Platform, which I can explain more about -- or you can check out the platform here: ajustclimate.org
Meleah Geertsma
01:13:22
Communications capacity is key, too - both traditional and social media.
Meleah Geertsma
01:13:37
It's become a much much bigger part of what we all do together.
Patricia Flores
01:18:27
Interesting, yesterday I attended MATTER's Health Equity program. Dr. Arwady was the main speaker and her whole stance was about bringing people from the community to be part of the change and take on leadership roles. Good to hear this perspective.
Alexis Grant
01:22:03
yes-- They need to recreate the system instead of putting band-aids on it
Joseph Rittmann
01:23:09
Where is the state department of health in this? Don't they inspect community water and sanitation according to some standard?
Washieka Torres
01:23:45
What are some outcomes you have seen from your work? How does your advocacy address environmental racism?Could you provide an example?
Meleah Geertsma
01:25:41
To Joseph's question, we've encountered IDPH very little in the water work that I do. There are some interesting splits in jurisdiction over water systems in our state.
Meleah Geertsma
01:26:59
My understanding is that on the drinking water side, Illinois EPA has oversight of community water systems that serve the public; IDPH has oversight of non-community water systems (schools, resorts, factories, etc.) served by their own sources like wells.
Meleah Geertsma
01:27:41
On the sanitary sewer side, again Illinois EPA is supposed to enforce requirements related to maintaining and operating the systems.
Alexis Grant
01:28:03
This is the most recent chicago air quality report https://www.chicago.gov/content/dam/city/depts/cdph/statistics_and_reports/Air_Quality_Health_doc_FINALv4.pdf
Sari Buffill
01:30:05
thank you!
Amy Bailey
01:30:06
Thank you so much!
Alyson Giordano
01:30:07
Thank you!!
Sarah Ferguson
01:30:13
thank you so much!
Patricia Flores
01:30:15
Thank you!
Maribel Alvarez
01:30:16
Thank you so much!!!
Zoey Martin-Lockhart
01:30:20
thank you!
Amy Herzog
01:30:21
thanks!!
Isaac
01:30:23
Thank you!
Ruth Velazquez
01:30:37
Thank you!
Nicole Bertucci
01:30:53
Thanks you so much
Alexis Grant
01:32:00
Healthy Chicago 2025: https://www.chicago.gov/city/en/depts/cdph/provdrs/healthy_communities/svcs/healthy-chicago-2025.html
Yukyan Lam
01:34:33
There is still a lot of 'victim-blaming' that I think public health experts can help counter. E.g., communities hearing people saying it's because of your 'lifestyle choices' that you have these health issues. I would encourage folks to take a look at the American Public Health Association's first-ever policy statement on environmental justice, which was adopted in 2019. Has some great background, as well as recommendations on how the public health community can do more to promote environmental justice and health equity. https://www.apha.org/policies-and-advocacy/public-health-policy-statements/policy-database/2020/01/14/addressing-environmental-justice-to-achieve-health-equity
Meleah Geertsma
01:38:52
I can stay on a few minutes past the top of the hour.
Stephanie Salgado
01:40:06
Public health IS political :)
Alexis Grant
01:42:35
YES
Alexis Grant
01:43:10
APHA should be free to community health workers, organizers, and community research partners.
Amy Bailey
01:43:12
One of the best sociology conferences I’ve participated in “comped” a number of people who were housing insecure into the conference. They uniformly asked the best questions in paper sessions. It was amazing.
Amy Bailey
01:49:49
Thank you!
Alyson Giordano
01:49:51
Thank you so much! This was one of my favorite sessions so far
Nicole Bertucci
01:49:53
Thank you so much
Sari Buffill
01:49:54
thank you!
Miguel Rodriguez
01:49:55
Thank you
Sarah Ferguson
01:49:56
Thank you!
Kate Nilles
01:50:00
Thank you both!
Adrian Seeley
01:50:07
Thank you!!
Celeste Aguirre
01:50:13
thank you!
Ameesha Mehta-Sampath
01:50:18
thank you- fantastic webinar
Washieka Torres
01:57:13
I'm curious how your work varies (or if it varies) between natural/protected, rural, and urban areas? Especially with respect to the issues at hand, the different involved and interested parties, what form environmental justice takes in these different contexts, etc.
Zoey Martin-Lockhart
01:58:27
Yeah, I was thinking about those dynamics with oil and gas development in Indigenous lands, particularly in Utah and Alaska (I'm sure elsewhere too)
Sarah Ferguson
01:58:37
Philly is the same way. it got rerouted to a lower income area
Shannon Kim
01:58:49
Same with Milwaukee as well! Bronzeville in Milwaukee used to be thriving until a highway cut it off from the rest of the ciyu
Shannon Kim
01:58:51
city*
Amy Bailey
01:58:58
On the West Coast, the highways go through historic “Chinatowns” and some Latinx neighborhoods.
Zoey Martin-Lockhart
02:00:10
The Trump admin got rid of a two national monuments in, declared by Clinton and Obama, one of which was specifically made due in part to activism by several Indigenous tribes (Dine, Hopi, Ute, Zuni, I think). And then that created more options to sell drilling spots....
Shreyas Shastri
02:00:16
Good podcast episode on eminent domain is the 5-4 episode on kilo v new London, very informative about how eminent domain works
Shreyas Shastri
02:00:24
Kelo v new london*
Amy Bailey
02:00:25
@Zoey - yes!
Washieka Torres
02:01:21
can speak about environmental ableism and how this intersects with environmental racism and/or the work they do
Amy Bailey
02:02:31
Wilderness access (primarily in Pacific Northwest) blog here: http://www.wheelchairwandering.com/
Washieka Torres
02:03:27
walkability
Washieka Torres
02:05:13
Does your organization tackle any issues related to climate change and involving folks in that?
Shreyas Shastri
02:05:13
Would those environmental factors then be considered comorbidities of the larger disease?
Alexis Grant
02:06:57
this idea of "cumulative impact" was mentioned in the talk- many times people are exposed to multiple things, compounding issues
Washieka Torres
02:07:57
how do you coordinate your efforts when you're tackling an objective from so many different angles?
Amy Bailey
02:08:20
How does excess vulnerability to environmental disasters (thinking of the Ninth Ward in NOLA) fit into the story?
Amy Bailey
02:10:47
Active decisions about which infrastructure to maintain and which to abandon - also construction of lower-income/quality housing in environmentally vulnerable areas.
Alexis Grant
02:12:05
yes-- and the reason why Flint had lead in their water was due to a lack of investment in the pipes that went to those communities.
Kate Nilles
02:16:17
Thank you!
Sari Buffill
02:16:23
thanks!
LaShonda D. Tate
02:16:24
Have a good night!
Celeste Aguirre
02:16:27
thank you!